When Corrective Exercise Is Necessary (And When It’s Not)

Corrective exercise plays a vital role in addressing movement dysfunctions, muscular imbalances, and postural issues. It can help individuals improve overall function, reduce the risk of injuries, and enhance performance.
The Love Central - Corrective exercise refers to the use of specific exercises and techniques to address muscular imbalance The Love Central - Corrective exercise refers to the use of specific exercises and techniques to address muscular imbalance
Corrective exercise refers to the use of specific exercises and techniques to address muscular imbalance
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  • Corrective exercise refers to the use of specific exercises and techniques to address muscular imbalances, etc
  • While corrective exercise can be beneficial for many individuals, it is essential to understand when it is necessary and when it is not
  • In this article, we will explore the situations in which corrective exercise is the best course of action

What if you could change the way your body works with just a few exercises? What if you could avoid pain, injury, and limitations by doing something simple and effective? That’s what corrective exercise can do for you. 

It’s a method of fixing the problems that affect your muscles and movement patterns. It’s tailored to your specific needs and goals. 

For example, office workers often have tight hip flexors from sitting in a chair all day. This can affect their posture and cause lower back pain. Corrective exercise can help to stretch these muscles and restore normal movement patterns.

But how does it work? And what are the benefits? You’ll be surprised by what you can achieve with corrective exercise.

Steps for Corrective Exercise

Corrective exercise has four steps: relax, stretch, strengthen, and train. Video source: YouTube: National Academy of sports Medicine

Corrective exercise has four steps: relax, stretch, strengthen, and train. These steps are based on the Corrective Exercise Continuum (CEx), a model by the National Academy of Sports Medicine (NASM) to help fitness professionals fix their clients’ movement problems:

  • Relax: This step uses techniques like foam rolling or massage to calm down the nervous system that controls the tight muscles. This helps the muscles loosen up and get ready for stretching.
  • Stretch: This step uses techniques like static stretching or neuromuscular stretching to make the tight muscles longer. This helps increase flexibility and mobility.
  • Strengthen: This step uses techniques like isolated strengthening or positional isometrics to make the weak muscles work harder. This helps increase stability and strength.
  • Train: This step uses techniques like dynamic movements or functional patterns to teach the nervous system how to use the right muscles for complex movements. This helps increase performance and function.

When is Corrective Exercise Necessary?

Corrective exercise is necessary when you have a movement compensation or imbalance that affects your posture, balance, or coordination. This can be caused by various factors, such as:

  • Poor habits: Repeating certain movements or positions over time can lead to muscle imbalances and faulty movement patterns. For example, slouching at your desk can cause your shoulders to round forward and your chest muscles to tighten.
  • Injuries: Suffering an injury can alter your movement patterns and cause compensations in other parts of your body. For example, spraining your ankle can cause you to shift your weight to the other leg and affect your hip alignment.
  • Aging: As you get older, your muscles tend to lose strength and elasticity, which can affect your movement quality and range of motion. For example, aging can cause your spine to lose its natural curvature and your posture to become stooped.

When is Corrective Exercise Not Necessary?

Corrective exercise is not necessary when you have a balanced and efficient movement pattern that does not cause any pain or discomfort. This means that your muscles are working in harmony and your joints are moving through their optimal range of motion.

However, this does not mean that you should stop exercising or stretching altogether. Maintaining a regular physical activity routine can help you keep your muscles strong and flexible, your joints healthy, and your body resilient.

You should also monitor your movement quality regularly and seek professional advice if you notice any changes or problems. Sometimes, corrective exercise may not be enough to fix a serious or chronic issue, and you may need other interventions such as medication, surgery, or rehabilitation.

The Love Central -
Corrective exercise has four steps relax stretch strengthen and train Image source Freepik

Examples of Corrective Exercises

Here are some examples of corrective exercises that you can try depending on your situation:

  • If you have tight hip flexors from sitting too much, you can try this exercise: Kneel on one knee with the other leg bent at 90 degrees in front of you. Tuck your pelvis under and squeeze your glutes. Lean forward slightly until you feel a stretch in the front of your hip. Hold for 30 seconds and switch sides. Repeat 2-3 times per side.
  • If you have rounded shoulders from slouching too much, you can try this exercise: Stand with your back against a wall and your feet shoulder-width apart. Bring your arms up to form a W shape with your elbows bent at 90 degrees. Press your elbows, wrists, and back of your head against the wall. Hold for 30 seconds and relax. Repeat 2-3 times.
  • If you have weak glutes from sitting too much, you can try this exercise: Lie on your back with your knees bent and your feet flat on the floor. Lift your hips off the floor and squeeze your glutes. Hold for 2 seconds and lower. Repeat 15-20 times.

Conclusion: When Corrective Exercise Is Necessary (And When It’s Not)

Corrective exercise plays a vital role in addressing movement dysfunctions, muscular imbalances, and postural issues. It can help individuals improve overall function, reduce the risk of injuries, and enhance performance. 

However, it is important to recognize when corrective exercise is necessary and when it may not be the most appropriate approach.

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